Archive for the ‘Flight Training’ Category

ATC helps out VFR pilot stuck in IMC

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Great job to the ATC, who received an award this week for helping out a stranded pilot. Way to keep your head about you pilot as well!

Airspace Memory Pegs and Review

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

A – Altitude Above 18,000 MSL to 60,000 MSL
B – Busy (Permission to enter or on IFR Flight Plan)
C – Communication (okay when communication established with the Controller)
D – Dialogue (with the controller)
E – Elsewhere
G – Go for it, you are on your on in the wide open sky…

Holy Second Class Medical, batman!

Sunday, April 24th, 2011

Well as I study for my exam today I started breaking out the old E6B, Navigational Plotter, looking at my logbook and…my medical certificate, holy cow last done 4/21/2008, wasn’t even thinking!  Gotta get that done this week.  Will visit Dr. Carlton Pittard, in Grapevine, TX!

In case you don’t know, I refreshed my mind on what requires, what medical when and so on.

First class certificates are required for those intending to be pilot-in-command in an air carrier operation requiring an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate. Other operations, including those under Part 91, may require a first class medical for insurance purposes, although it is not a federal requirement in such cases.

To qualify for the first class medical certificate, pilots must meet the requirements for the third and second class certificates plus:

* Heart Function: Electrocardiogram must show normal heart function once at age 35 and annually for those age 40 and over

For pilots under 40 years of age, first class medical certificates expire on the last day of the month they were issued, one year from the date of issue. The FAA introduced this rule on July 24, 2008.[15][16] For all others, they are valid until the last day of the month, six months after they were issued. The certificate holder may then only exercise the privileges of a second class medical certificate until the last day of the month, twelve months after the certificate was issued, thereafter the privileges of a third class medical until the last day of the month, twenty four months after the medical was issued ( FAA $61.23 (d-1-iii) ).

  • Student Pilot: an individual who is learning to fly under the tutelage of a flight instructor and who is permitted to fly alone under specific, limited circumstances
    • Hold at least a current third class medical certificate (except for glider, balloon or sport pilot).
  • Sport Pilot: an individual who is authorized to fly only Light-sport Aircraft
    • It is the only powered aircraft certificate that does not require a medical certificate; a valid vehicle driver’s license can be used as proof of medical competence provided the prospective pilot was not rejected for their last Airman Medical Certificate (see Sport Pilot Catch 22).
  • Recreational Pilot: an individual who may fly aircraft of up to 180 horsepower (130 kW) and 4 seats in the daytime for pleasure only
  • Private Pilot: an individual who may fly for pleasure or personal business, generally without accepting compensation
    • Obtain at least a third class medical certificate from an Aviation Medical Examiner (except for glider or balloon)
  • Commercial Pilot: an individual who may, with some restrictions, fly for compensation or hire
    • To fly for hire, the pilot must hold a second class medical certificate, which is valid for 12 months.
  • Airline Transport Pilot (often called ATP): an individual authorized to act as pilot in command for a scheduled airline
    • First class certificates are required for those intending to be pilot-in-command in an air carrier operation requiring an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate. Other operations, including those under Part 91, may require a first class medical for insurance purposes, although it is not a federal requirement in such cases.

A medical certificate is not necessary to fly a glider, balloon, or light-sport Aircraft. An ultralight aircraft may be piloted without a pilot certificate or a medical certificate.

What do I have to do for my second class medical?

Third class certifications require the least involved examinations of all medical certifications. They are required for those intending to be pilot-in-command of an aircraft under the Private or Recreational pilot certificates or while exercising solo privileges as a student pilot. To qualify for a third class medical certificate, pilots must meet the following requirements:

  • Distant vision: 20/20 or better in each eye separately, with or without correction
  • Intermediate vision: 20/40 or better in each eye separately, with or without correction, at age 50 and over, as measured at 32 inches
  • Near vision: 20/40 or better in each eye separately, with or without correction, as measured at a distance of 16 inches (410 mm)
  • Color vision: Demonstrate the ability to perceive the colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties
  • Hearing: Demonstrate the ability to hear an average conversational voice in a quiet room, using both ears, at a distance of six feet, with their back turned to the examiner, or pass an approved audiometric test
  • Ear, Nose, and Throat: Exhibit no ear disease or condition manifested by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of speech or equilibrium
  • Blood Pressure: Under 155/95
  • Mental Status: No diagnosis of psychosis, bipolar disorder, or severe personality disorders
  • Substance Dependence: No dependence on alcohol or any pharmacological substance in the previous two years

FAA Medical Examiners

FAA Medical Questions

So it begins today! Commericial Flight Training

Friday, April 8th, 2011

Yep, been thinking about, contemplating,  wishing to start and finally some 9-10 years after I thought I am gonna do this…I am gonna do this! :)

FAA Commercial Pilot Resources Link

Below are to resources directly from FAA revision date 2005 although I downloaded them today!

FAA finalized 51% percent rule on aircraft building

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

The FAA fortunately left the limiting language out of the new 51 percent rule that applies to aircraft owners building their own planes.

Here is the FAA rules for amatuer built aircraft

Here is the link to the FAA Advisory Circular 20-27G, on Certification and Operation of Amateur-Built Aircraft, which tells amateur builders on how to properly certify each step of the building process and help those guys, like me who would have to do the builder assist program to not only finish, but to get it right!   According to the rule existing kits will be grandfathered in under the new rules.

Thanks to our GA lobbists at AOPA and EAA for getting these things done right for us pilots and aircraft owners!